Articles from 03/2010

  • Sexual Role-Reversals

    Male pipefish get “pregnant,” and Atlantic slippersnails change sexes as they grow. Researchers are now uncovering how and why these bizarre sex strategies occur.

  • Emotion’s Alchemy

    New insights into the science of emotion unravel the seeming neurological magic that turns emotions into social expressions.

  • Hot Soil and Ancient Beasts

    In this week’s Findings Log, we take a look at new research on body cues and abstract thought, warming soils, what roamed Earth before T-Rex, and more.

  • Long Time Coming

    The story of one of history's most infamous math problems illustrates the difficulties facing congress in the wake of healthcare reform.

  • Portfolio: Colonial Intelligence

    Petri dish images of bacterial colonies show the complex patterns that emerge as bacteria cope in a hostile environment.

  • Exactly, Ed Yong

    Ed Yong’s blog Not Exactly Rocket Science took home three Research Blogging Awards, including the coveted Research Blog of the Year. Dave Munger talks with him.

  • Scent as Design

    This week, scientists, designers, and artists will gather in New York to discuss how our lives could be transformed by recognizing scent as design.

  • I Tried Almost Everything Else

    John Rinn, snowboarder, skateboarder, and “genomic origamist,” on why we should dumpster-dive in our genomes and the inspiration of a middle-distance runner.

  • Embracing the Anthropocene

    The Earth has entered a new geological period in which human influence dominates the state of the planet, compounding uncertainty about the future.

  • Portfolio: The Adolescent Stage

    Photographs of microscopic aquatic animals capture complex life stages in ways not possible in standard textbooks.

  • Are Animals People?

    The disparity between experiments that suggest sophisticated cognition in animals and those that find hard limits to animal intelligence has created a debate over animal “personhood.”

  • Going, Going, Gone

    The second most common element in the universe is increasingly rare on Earth—except, for now, in America.

  • Earth-like Planets Aren’t Rare

    Renowned planetary scientist James Kasting on the odds of finding another Earth-like planet and the power of science fiction.

  • Extinction’s Tipping Points

    How the extinction of the dinosaurs, Arctic methane leaks, and nuclear weaponry reveal the precarious thresholds of life on Earth.

  • The Paintbrush and the Plant

    Thinking spring? Ramble through the lush floral landscapes of The Art of Plant Evolution, where modern science and the tradition of botanical painting meet.

  • Why Do We Believe?

    Science is developing new insights into how religious beliefs may have evolved, but often the research brings up more questions than it answers.

  • Fishy Findings and Kinky Sex

    In this week's Findings Log, we examine new research on Earth’s magnetic fields, confusion about what constitutes “sex,” frogs that change sex, and more.

  • When True Innovation Begins

    Amy Cannon, green chemist and non-profit director, answers our 10 questions, discussing low-energy solar cells, training scientists to weed out toxicity, and what makes benign chemistry such a good business proposition.

  • Press Gang

    With New York City about to let bloggers qualify for press passes, a look at what breaking down the walls between old and new media means for science reporting.

  • The Ancient, Distant, and Dead

    Inspired by scientific research, Katie Paterson creates art based on data from faraway melting glaciers, long-dead stars, and the initial moments of the universe.

  • A Sober Assessment

    Alcohol is an important part of life in many cultures throughout the world, but there are many misperceptions about this common social lubricant.

  • The Ends of Earth, and Beyond

    To answer the most pressing questions about the origins of the universe, scientists must retreat to isolated pinnacles in the Andes or the South Pole. Anil Ananthaswamy follows in their footsteps in his new book.

  • Books to Read Now

    March releases follow physicists to the ends of the Earth; examine our obsession with stuff; and sift through the annals of the search for wisdom, in science, philosophy, and beyond.

Now on SEEDMAGAZINE.COM

  • Ideas

    I Tried Almost Everything Else

    John Rinn, snowboarder, skateboarder, and “genomic origamist,” on why we should dumpster-dive in our genomes and the inspiration of a middle-distance runner.

  • Ideas

    Going, Going, Gone

    The second most common element in the universe is increasingly rare on Earth—except, for now, in America.

  • Ideas

    Earth-like Planets Aren’t Rare

    Renowned planetary scientist James Kasting on the odds of finding another Earth-like planet and the power of science fiction.

The Seed Salon

Video: conversations with leading scientists and thinkers on fundamental issues and ideas at the edge of science and culture.

Are We Beyond the Two Cultures?

Video: Seed revisits the questions C.P. Snow raised about science and the humanities 50 years by asking six great thinkers, Where are we now?

Saved by Science

Audio slideshow: Justine Cooper's large-format photographs of the collections behind the walls of the American Museum of Natural History.

The Universe in 2009

In 2009, we are celebrating curiosity and creativity with a dynamic look at the very best ideas that give us reason for optimism.

Revolutionary Minds
The Interpreters

In this installment of Revolutionary Minds, five people who use the new tools of science to educate, illuminate, and engage.

The Seed Design Series

Leading scientists, designers, and architects on ideas like the personal genome, brain visualization, generative architecture, and collective design.

The Seed State of Science

Seed examines the radical changes within science itself by assessing the evolving role of scientists and the shifting dimensions of scientific practice.

A Place for Science

On the trail of the haunts, homes, and posts of knowledge, from the laboratory to the field.

Portfolio

Witness the science. Stunning photographic portfolios from the pages of Seed magazine.

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